Sunday, September 2, 2018

Posted by DB Production Company | File under : ,
abandoned barn new jersey auto shop














Urban exploration is not always about finding abandoned houses, warehouses, factories, or massive amounts of cars. Sometimes it’s all about the small find: little places or items that can still tell a story. This was the case when I stumbled upon this abandoned auto-shop in New Jersey.

Years ago when I lived in New Jersey, I would often just walk through the woods. Nature up north is hard to beat. I was following a path that I normally did, but one day, I went a little farther. Through some reeds, I saw a structure in the distance. I scouted out the area from where I was, and after I determined it to be abandoned, I decided to take a look.

It was a basic wood frame building with a cinderblock foundation. It was quite modern, but it still looks like I had not been used in years. There were a few bay doors, and with the tires, gaskets, and drums lying around, it appeared to be and old shop of some sort. It was probably for trucks based off the type of tires, and I remember seeing old dump trucks at another location somewhat nearby.

Next to that building was a smaller building that looked like a small barn on the inside. There were some interesting things lying around like some old pictures and a CD. This was closer to some houses, so I did not spend much time here. I just took a few pictures and left.

While this isn’t exciting like the abandoned airport I explored, that’s what urban exploration is like: sometimes you find gold, and other times it’s an old soda can found in a river in Alaska. That’s the game, and it is what you make of it! If you want to see more of what Mother Nature takes back as hers, then keep coming back to this blog, as there is plenty more to come. Thanks for stopping by.




abandoned barn new jersey auto shop

abandoned barn new jersey auto shop

abandoned barn new jersey auto shop

abandoned barn new jersey auto shop

abandoned barn new jersey auto shop

abandoned barn new jersey auto shop

abandoned barn new jersey auto shop

abandoned barn new jersey auto shop


Tuesday, July 24, 2018

Posted by DB Production Company | File under : , ,
preston airfield marlboro airport new jersey abandoned

New Jersey is filled with history. Some of it is preserved, and some of it is left to rot. This is the case with this abandoned airport. Preston Airfield, also known as Marlboro Airport, located in Morganville, New Jersey is one of the top places that I have been to. While it is a smaller airfield, it’s not something that is as common as an abandoned house.

Rhea Preston was the man responsible for building the airport. In 1932, Preston flew his first plane at age 20. After that, he started taking lessons, and was hooked. In 1939, he began using a flat portion of the Preston Farm to take off and land his Luscombe Silvaire that he bought that year. When WWII started, he left for the Navy.

preston airfield marlboro airport new jersey abandoned

When he came back home, be wanted to build is own airport on the 44 acre farm. It took a while for the township to get on board, but all the necessary paperwork was completed, and the Preston Airport opened in 1954 with a single dirt runway. Just before 1972, the airfield gained a paved runway and was later sold. Preston said it was a lot of work to keep the place running, and it wasn't exactly profitable.

By 1974, there were about 100 planes associated with the airfield. The same year, it was named the “best maintained” airport by the state’s Aviation Advisory Council. The next year, it was approved for 21 new hangers and an 840 square foot operational building. As time went on, the name was changed to Marlboro Airport (due to the township it was in – Marlboro Township), and owners changed.

Its fate became sealed when it was purchased in 2000 by Marlboro Holdings LLC, and that land was to be turned into housing. It was closed for good in 2002, and the hopes of it being turned into housing failed after federal count cases proved the mayor accepted bribes to get the area re-zoned.

Today, everything is gone expect for some rubble and the crumbling runway. When I went in 2010, the buildings were still there, and so was the runway. Part of the airfield is used as a cemetery, and I believe the rest is now owned by the Monmouth County Park System.

I sort of went on a whim while scouting another location that will be featured in an upcoming post, and I went while the sun was going down. I don’t like going to abandoned places in the dark. It’s harder to see, harder to take pictures, and looks more suspicious. However, I parked my car at the end of the cemetery, which still had some snow on the ground where it was piled up after the last storm, and walked up to the field.

With the sun setting, my pictures were not that great, so I apologize. The area was eerie. It was empty. Therefore, I loved it. The buildings and hangers had some plane parts, paperwork, and other historic artifacts of the once popular airport. It was messy inside, but it did not seem like it was too vandalized. I didn’t get to explore all the buildings due to the setting sun, but I did get to see the hangers on the north side of the property, and south-west side.

It’s a shame that history falls apart sometimes like this, but it’s people like me who hope to help preserve it, if only just text and some pictures. If you wish to learn more about the airfield, there is a book by Randall Gabrielan that has a small section on it, but it also covers some great local history. There is also a website by Paul Freeman that covers abandoned and little-know airfields and covers the airport history in great detail. If you want to see more of what Mother Nature takes back as hers, then keep coming back to this blog, as there is plenty more to come.




preston airfield marlboro airport new jersey abandoned

preston airfield marlboro airport new jersey abandoned

preston airfield marlboro airport new jersey abandoned

preston airfield marlboro airport new jersey abandoned

preston airfield marlboro airport new jersey abandoned

preston airfield marlboro airport new jersey abandoned

preston airfield marlboro airport new jersey abandoned

preston airfield marlboro airport new jersey abandoned

preston airfield marlboro airport new jersey abandoned

preston airfield marlboro airport new jersey abandoned


Wednesday, January 6, 2016

Posted by DB Production Company | File under : , ,
dad's root beer draft can 1970s vintage classic old alaska good rush history story abandoned skagway










It’s been a while since I have posted on here, but I wanted to bring to you another small find of mine.  If you have read the blog before, you know that I found an old Rosen’s Beverages soda bottle in a river in New Jersey.  I have a thing for old bottles and cans.  When I was a kid, I thought nothing of them, but now I realize just what a part of history these things can be.  This time we are not in New Jersey though.  As a matter of fact, we are on the complete other side of the country, in Alaska.

As mentioned in a previous post about The Pullen House in Skagway, Alaska, I had the pleasure of spending four months in the beautiful state of Alaska.  It is without a doubt, the most beautiful places I have ever been.  From the natural wonders, to the manmade history of once chased dream of finding gold.

I am back again in Skagway, and this time I was walking up a small creek.  The creek took a bit of a turn to a much higher elevated state.  Now, I didn’t have my camera with me at the time, so I only had my older phone.  I did manage to get some pictures.  There was more than just water and dirt.  The manmade past was in front of me, sitting in the typical Alaskan fashion: ruins.

dad's root beer draft can 1970s vintage classic old alaska good rush history story abandoned skagway

As I was climbing up, something caught my eye in the water.  I looked down and saw a can.  Upon further inspection, it was a can of “Dad’s Draft Root Beer”.  I was never a fan of root beer, but I instantly started wondering how it got here.  The can looks like it was from the 1970s, so I was imagining kids playing around the possibly still standing bridge/ruins, drinking their “Dad’s Root Beer”, then throwing the can in the creek.

UPDATE: After being in touch with Dad's Root Beer, they believe this can could actually date back to the 1950s!

Alaska has some brutal winters.  Way below freezing.  How many times has this can been frozen under the creek?

The can is in nowhere near good shape, and it has no value to it.  However, the story behind it, the location, the thrill of finding it, now that is where the value is to me.  There are holes in it and you can barely make out the artwork.  From what I can almost make out on the can, it looks like it was packaged by a now renamed or defunct company named “Noel Canning” out of Washington, was enjoyed by some in Skagway, Alaska, and found by someone forty years (me) later who brought it back Florida, where it now lives.

I like old things.  It’s the stories that go with them, even if it’s all just speculation.  This was simply, and pretty much still is simply, just trash.  However, finding it on an expedition through The Last Frontier in an area surrounding you with history?  Now that’s a reason to become a fan of root beer.

Dad’s Root Beer is apparently still around and making soda.  They celebrated their 75th anniversary back in 2012.  They don’t seem very active on social media, and their website doesn’t seem updated, but hopefully this little story can bring them a smile if they stumble upon it.  Just remember: you never know what stories trash can tell you.

dad's root beer draft can 1970s vintage classic old alaska good rush history story abandoned skagway

dad's root beer draft can 1970s vintage classic old alaska good rush history story abandoned skagway

dad's root beer draft can 1970s vintage classic old alaska good rush history story abandoned skagway

dad's root beer draft can 1970s vintage classic old alaska good rush history story abandoned skagway

dad's root beer draft can 1970s vintage classic old alaska good rush history story abandoned skagway


Thursday, July 9, 2015

Posted by DB Production Company | File under : , ,
deserted village of feltville abandoned town new jersey random abanoned dylan benson

In relation to what you typically find with urban exploration, an abandoned house is more or less common.  One lone, standing building in the middle of nowhere is fun, but what about what you come across an entire town?  This is just the case in Berkeley Heights, New Jersey where a village from the 1800s still can be seen today.

In the mid 1800s, businessman David Felt realized he could not keep up with the demand from his merchants with the mill he had already built in New York.  He looked for land in New Jersey and bought up some property from the Willcox family.  Peter Willcox was the first settler in area that David Felt was looking at who had built a sawmill in that area in the late 1730s.

After Felt bought the land and built his mill and a couple dams, he built a town for the workers.  This town became known as “Feltville”.  The town housed 175 people by 1850, and that usually meant about four families per large house, and two per small house.

In the late 1860s when David Felt sold the property, many other businesses came and went such as in 1882 when it was turned into a summer resort called Glenside Park.  That failed when the Jersey shore (not the show) gained more popularity.

As time went on, the Union Country Park Commission purchased the location, and it was added as a historic location.

The location is open to the public.  When I went there (many years ago), some buildings were in the process of being refurbished.  Some building had people living in them.  Some buildings were tourist buildings.  I, of course, was more interested in none of the above, and instead the ones you were not supposed to enter.

Some of those buildings were in rough shape.  I could tell they were used for storage for building “parts”.  I even went down in a creepy basement.  There were some really historic things to see.  Even the architecture of the building was something to experience such the brick chimney poking through the plaster and paint in the upper bedroom.

When I went, there was an occasional police car.  The houses had plenty of windows, but of course that goes both ways, so I would place myself against a wall to remain out of sight, and all was good.

I could continue writing, but since a picture is worth a thousand words, enjoy some of the pictures I took while I was there.  If you want to see more stuff like this, keep coming back as there is plenty more to come!  Thanks for stopping by.



deserted village of feltville abandoned town new jersey random abanoned dylan benson

deserted village of feltville abandoned town new jersey random abanoned dylan benson

deserted village of feltville abandoned town new jersey random abanoned dylan benson

deserted village of feltville abandoned town new jersey random abanoned dylan benson

deserted village of feltville abandoned town new jersey random abanoned dylan benson

deserted village of feltville abandoned town new jersey random abanoned dylan benson

deserted village of feltville abandoned town new jersey random abanoned dylan benson

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deserted village of feltville abandoned town new jersey random abanoned dylan benson

deserted village of feltville abandoned town new jersey random abanoned dylan benson

deserted village of feltville abandoned town new jersey random abanoned dylan benson

deserted village of feltville abandoned town new jersey random abanoned dylan benson

deserted village of feltville abandoned town new jersey random abanoned dylan benson
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deserted village of feltville abandoned town new jersey random abanoned dylan benson

deserted village of feltville abandoned town new jersey random abanoned dylan benson

deserted village of feltville abandoned town new jersey random abanoned dylan benson

deserted village of feltville abandoned town new jersey random abanoned dylan benson